5 Unusual Yorkshire Placenames

 

1. Kirkby Overblow

 

All Saints Church is an important part of the village name. Picture credit: Gordon Hatton wikipedia creative commons.
All Saints Church is an important part of the village name. Picture credit: Gordon Hatton wikipedia creative commons.

The village of Kirkby Overblow between Harrogate and Leeds is perhaps one of the more unusual names. However, don’t get too excited because the Overblow part does not come from anything naughty, but is merely a corruption of the word “Oreblow,” which is a reference to an iron smelting orks which was once here. The pre-fix Kirkby means “church village,” so put together it means “The Church Village of the Ore Blowers.”

 

2. Thornton Le Beans

The village street of Thornton le Beans.
A village street in Thornton le Beans. Picture credit Gordon Hatton wikipedia creative commons

This village located at the top of North Yorkshire, near Northallerton means simply “a farm with thorn bushes that grows beans.” That is all, but is still a great name to look out for on a signpost and it rolls beautifully off the tongue and it still gets pretty windy up on t’moors.

3. Crackpot

A lovely view over Crackpot Dale Picture credit:
A lovely view over Crackpot Dale Picture credit: Chris Downer

High up in the Yorkshire Dales lies the village of “Crackpot.” It is made up of a combination between the old English “kraka,” which means “crow” and an ancient Viking word, “pot,” which means a cavity or hole in the rock. It’s still a barmy Yorkshire name though!

4. Jump

 

The village of “Jump,” is situated a few miles south East of Barnsley. According to local legend the village acquired its name because of a stream which ran through its centre. Local miners had to “jump” across the stream in order to gain access and cross from one side of the village to the other.

 

5. And finally…Wetwang

 

The first unusually named place that springs to mind- Wetwang.. Picture Credit Dave Axe (IFY community)
The first unusually named place that springs to mind- Wetwang.. Picture Credit Dave Axe (IFY community & summonedbyfells flickr

 

The East Yorkshire village of Wetwang has often been the butt of many jokes, but actually its origins are somewhat mundane. The most common theory is that it derived from the old Viking word, “Vaetvangrr,” which simply means “field for the summons of trial or action.” The late Richard Whitely famously became the Mayor of Wetwang in 1998, an honour of which has been held by weatherman, Paul Hudson since 2005.

 

 

Credit: www.keighleynews.co.uk

http://www.yorkshire-england.co.uk/PlaceNameMeaningsAtoD.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetwang

http://www.nidderdale-iron.co.uk/sites/4564327456